AU Live

Why I joined Greek life

Bree Gannon

August 25, 2017


Filed under OPINION

Leaving home, your parents and your friends to start a new chapter of your life is something that can be scary to some. Doing something different, joining something different and being something different than what you have been used to is exciting and nerve wracking all at the same time.College is the time to break out of your shell and explore all the new things going into the new chapter adulthood has to offer. Whether that be joining a club, intramural sport or Greek life, there is something different for everyone.I was that person, who came out of high school and wanted to be different and do something different than what was expected of me. So, I joined a sorority. Now by this time you might be thinking, “Yikes, why would you join Greek life?” This is the exact question that went through my head after I decided to go through recruitment with my roommate. All hesitation aside, it was a great decision.Greek life does not subscribe to the bad stereotypes that you see in movies or hear from your parents or neighbors down the hall. Being Greek is so much more. It is commitment, community service, being a part of something bigger than yourself, helping others, leadership and acceptance.Going through recruitment was probably one of my most awkward experiences due to the fact that I am an awkward person and hate talking about myself. The chapter that I fell in love with was the very last one I had visited and did not picture myself in it at all. Through fate, I found out my childhood babysitter had joined the sorority I was interested in. She introduced me to all of the sisters and I learned so much information about sororities that I never knew.By then I was thinking that Greek life was not bad at all and I could actually see myself doing something I had never planned on doing when I got to AU. Flash forward to present day and joining my sorority three years ago was a good freshman decision. Being involved in something that was practically centered around helping others is such a giving experience.My philanthropy involves donating the necessities to live to those in rural Appalachia, inviting children of low income or less fortunate families to a summer camp and help those in need when it comes to living situations. Being involved in an organization that helps others is so rewarding and brings so much joy to me.Throughout my entire Greek life experience, I have not only learned a lot about my chapter, Greek life as a whole and my sisters, but also about myself. Don’t get me wrong, I am still an awkward person but I am not as awkward. Having 60 girls around me has helped bring me out of my shell and be the outgoing person I am today.Greek life is not just about the community service, academics, or helping others. It is about being comfortable around everyone and feeling accepted.I have went through my fair share of difficult times and having the shoulders of all my sisters to lean, has by far been such a rewarding feeling. If it were not for the support of my sister’s, I would not be writing this article or even feature in the newspaper you are reading.Never did I think that by joining Greek life I would gain future companions, my best friend, future bridesmaids, forever friends, and connections that will last a lifetime. The phrase “it’s not four years, it’s for life”, has some serious holding power when it comes to thinking of all the wonderful opportunities being involved has given me.The future can be scary especially if you are trying to go out and do something different than what you are used to. My advice for you is whether you think it’s for you or not, just try it. It does not hurt to take a step in a different direction and see if the things you are scared of or not sure about, are actually the right move for you. If you find it is not for you but something else is, at least you can say you tried and take a step in a different direction.

OPINION: The importance of Black History Month

Bex Hunter

February 17, 2017


Filed under OPINION

Being a mixed race person, I always related more to black culture than any other because everyone only ever saw me as half-black. There were people who honestly did not know what the other half of me was. I’ve always been fine with that because I am not ashamed of my blackness. I embrace it and am proud of my culture and my...

Sports Column: Women’s basketball in a league of their own

Sports Column: Women’s basketball in a league of their own

Noah Cloonan

February 3, 2017


Filed under OPINION

Winning a national championship is the ultimate dream for any college basketball player, but for the girls on the Ashland University women’s basketball team, that dream is not far from being a reality.I’ve had the distinct privilege of following the women’s basketball team over the past two seasons and I have conclude...

OPINION: Trump’s controversies with the press worsen: Administration team considers kicking press out of White House

Staff Editorial

January 20, 2017


Filed under OPINION

As the 2016 Election approached and came to a close, feelings of crisis began to spread among American journalists. Although at the time, no changes were made, reporters are now facing what may be one of the biggest changes to hit the White House and their journalistic freedoms.President-elect Donald T...

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Learning more about Ashland’s administrative departments: Student Affairs

Hannah Clayborne Vice President of Student Affairs

January 20, 2017


Filed under OPINION

The mission of the Division of Student Affairs is to “promote the academic purpose of the university while enhancing student learning outside of the classroom. Through collaboration with faculty, staff and students, we strive to build a strong community of respect and affirm the value of each ind...

OPINION: Dealing with the stress of finals week

Staff Editorial

December 9, 2016


Filed under OPINION

College life, especially for freshman, can be extremely stressful, especially when students are approaching their first semester of college finals.According to a study completed by the Associated Press, millennials, those between the ages of 18-27, are the most stressed members of any generation.In ...

OPINION: The dumpster fire of the 2016 Presidential Election

Kayla Gowdy

November 17, 2016


Filed under OPINION

LETTER TO THE EDITORSince the commencement of this presidential election cycle in the summer of 2015, never has there been a “normal moment.” 17 Republicans ran in the primary, and with candidates such as Rubio or Kasich, spirits were high in the Republican Party. Contrary to popular beliefs, ho...

OPINION: Trump’s misogyny poses threat to gender equality

Kate Siefert

November 3, 2016


Filed under OPINION

Hoping to go into a career in broadcast journalism, I have learned first hand, about the discrimination of women in the media endure everyday. At the college level, I have been ridiculed about the way I look ten-times more often than my male co-anchor. For those who believe women are treated equally,...

OPINION: 2016 Election popularizes third party vote

Staff Editorial

November 3, 2016


Filed under OPINION

Why people vote third partyIn the midst of a dumpster fire of an election cycle, many people are struggling with the decision of who to cast their ballot for in November. There are a growing number of voters who feel their choice of major political party candidate is not accurately representing them a...

The state of the country if we called it today

Kayla Gowdy and Sean Honaker

November 3, 2016


Filed under OPINION

With an election cycle that has been marred the past couple of weeks with a stream of debacles on both sides of the political spectrum, it is hard for many to see the light at the end of the tunnel or even have a clue of where the tunnel is potentially leading. Fortunately for the political realm, when in doubt, one can typically take a look at the poll numbers and election forecasts to regain their footing. Unfortunately, this election cycle is anything but typical and even these figures have been fairly difficult to decipher this campaign. In the spirit of trying to make this already painful process just a bit easier, here is a breakdown of the current results for this election cycle nationwide. The Presidential Race:According to predictions from Real Clear Politics, a popular political forecaster, there are currently eight key states and one Congressional district that are still considered toss-ups in this election cycle. These states include Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Maine’s second congressional district, Nevada, North Carolina, and Ohio. For simplicity’s sake, here are the breakdowns in each of the seven states:• Arizona (11): Clinton leads Trump 43.3 to 42.7• Colorado (9): Clinton leads Trump 44 to 40• Florida (29): Trump leads Clinton 44.8 to 44.3•  Georgia (16): Trump leads Clinton 46.7-43.2• Iowa (6): Trump leads Clinton 41.7 to 40.3• Maine’s second Congressional district (1): Trump leads Clinton 41.3 to 39.3 • North Carolina (15): Clinton leads Trump 46.5 to 41.3• Nevada (6): Clinton leads Trump 45.2 to 43.7• Ohio (18): Trump leads Clinton 45.8 to 44.5Unfortunately for Trump, the polling numbers predict he will not capture the 270 electoral votes necessary to defeat Hillary Clinton. If the poll numbers are taken at face value, which would be risky even at this point given their fluctuation, and the candidate currently leading wins on election night, Hillary Clinton will take the White House with 304 electoral votes to Donald Trump’s 234. The Senate Race:Currently, the make-up of the Senate sits at a 54-46 Republican majority. For the 2016 election cycle, there are 34 seats out of the 100 total seats in the Senate up for re-election, and, of those 34, 24 are currently held by Republicans.Real Clear Politics lists 11 states as the battleground senate races, meaning they are significant to whichever party is aiming to hold the Senate as of January 1, 2017. The states are as follows: Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Missouri, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. For the case of simplicity, the breakdown of the leaders in each states are as follows:Florida: Rubio v Murphy • Rubio leads 49-43.4 (Republican lead)Illinois: Duckworth v Kirk • Duckworth leads 43.3-36.3 (Democrat leads)Indiana: Bahy v Young • Bahy leads 44.5-40.8 (Democrat lead)Iowa: Grassley v Judge • Grassley leads 54.8-37.5 (Republican leads)Missouri: Blunt v Kander • Blunt leads 45.7-44.7 (Republican lead)Nevada: Heck v Cortez-Masto• Heck leads 45.2-44.8 (Republican leads)New Hampshire: Ayotte v Hassan • Ayotte leads 47.2-45.5 (Republican leads)North Carolina: Burr v Ross • Burr leads 46.3-45.3 (Republican lead)Ohio: Portman v Strickland • Portman leads 51.3-36.8 (Republican leads)Pennsylvania: Toomey v McGinty • McGinty leads 44.3-42.3 (Democrat Leads)Wisconsin:  Feingold v Johnson • Feingold leads 50.3-43.5 (Democrat leads)Based off of the current make-up of the Senate, the Democrats will need to pick up four seats to split the Senate 50-50 or five seats to flip the majority 51-49 in their favor. If the election were called using current polling numbers, the Democrats would pick up four seats: Pennsylvania, Indiana, Wisconsin, and Illinois. The Republicans, however, would pick up Nevada, a Senate seat currently held by retiring Democrat Harry Reid. This, in addition to the seven seats they are expected to maintain, will keep the Senate at a 51-49 Republican majority. Ultimately, this means a Republican controlled Senate would be able to block potential legislation from the Democratic side of the isle even if Clinton were to win the White House under current Senate rules. Bottom Line:If the election were called based on the current polling results, there would a Democratically controlled White House and a Republican controlled Congress.This essentially would leave the country in the exact same shape it is currently. Unfortunately, this means it will continue to be extremely difficult to accomplish anything without bipartisan support, and it is likely this country will see at least two more years of partisan gridlock. 

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Sample Student

September 29, 2016


Filed under OPINION

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Sample Staff Member, Staff Writer

September 28, 2016


Filed under OPINION

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