AU Live

Campo looks forward to a new semester

Callan Pugh

January 20, 2017


Filed under FEATURES

Many breathed a sigh of relief as 2016 came to a close and 2017 began. It is the season of saying “new year, new me” and in AU’s case the season of welcoming in some new changes and working on improving on what is already in place. In a public relations email to students at the start of the semester, Dr. Carlos Campo addressed a few student concerns and requests.“We are working to create some choices for students, with some perhaps coming as soon as the fall of this year. We also hear requests for expanded hours for dining (under review), a bar on campus (probably not going to happen), later hours for The Rec (possible—looking into it), hot tubs on the quad (not this year), fire pits outside of Eagles’ Nest (coming soon), ice machines on every other floor in dorms (interesting, possible), air conditioning (not likely—though new housing will be equipped) and much more.”According to President Campo, the wellness campaign will be one of the focuses of this semester and onward. Recently, the university was selected as a White House Healthy Campus and “Dr. Sullivan and two students [visited] the White House [during the first week of classes] as part of that celebration.”Campo also looks forward to continuing work on the Ashland Rising 2020 initiative, a plan that the administration put into place upon Campo’s arrival. “One of the things that is clear is that our sporting events bring all of us together and so that’s one of the things we’ll continue to do,” Campo explained. “There’s such excitement about our sports teams, in particular our women’s basketball team, which is No. 1 in the nation in D2 of course, so it’s one of those things that will pull people on to campus.”Along with sports, Campo explained that the university plans to continue its Corporate Connections program, which brings in local corporations to campus in order to forge further connections between the university and the community. “One of the things we found is that our students are already [going out into the community], we just have to highlight it, to let more students know what’s going on,” said Campo. “Our students are engaged. They’re doing things like working on clothing drives. They’re reading to folks at Brethren care. They’re engaged with young students as well in after school reading programs and other things too. But it’s one of the things we want to see more of.”The university has also been taking advantage of the College Credit Plus program that allows students to come on to campus to earn college credit along with taking college level courses from their own high schools. Campo is also very excited about the new International Masters of Business Program, which he explained as a one-year program that was created for the busy professional. By providing weekends for finishing work, and being a fully online program, it allows students the chance to have a full-time job and still complete a graduate degree program. “It’s not for every student,” Campo said. “But we’re excited that a lot of students will take advantage of it these next few years.” Looking at this semester, Campo encouraged underclassmen to get outside of their comfort zone. “We tell students, ‘get involved in stuff you might not be interested in, and just see if that new perspective might add something [to your life],’” said Campo. For graduating seniors, Campo explained the last semester is like a marathon. “Finish strong,” advised Campo. “When you see the finish line it’s actually the time that’s toughest to finish. You kind of hit the wall and realize ‘Oh my gosh, am I going to finish?’ so of course the first thing is to get it done and stay focused.” Campo also suggested that seniors not wait until May to start thinking about what’s next. He explained that students should worry less about initial pay and more about finding organizations that align with personal values. He also encouraged those who are soon to be alum to keep the university close and to begin to consider how they can “give back to the institution,” and “stay connected to the institution.”“Ashland is only as strong as our students and our alum,” said Campo. “So that’s another thing we certainly want to say to our graduating seniors.”

Dr. Weaver: Not the average English professor

Callan Pugh

December 9, 2016


Filed under FEATURES

Finding life’s calling is as simple as “having a good time all the time”The question hangs in the air. “Good or bad?” The class stays silent for a few seconds, some students look down to avoid eye contact, others search for the answer in the book in front of them.  Dr. Russell Weaver, a pro...

The unknown future after 2016 Election: International students attempt to cope with fear

Luqman Al-Tarouti

December 9, 2016


Filed under FEATURES

The bedroom is dark. The lights keep flickering. Empty soft drink cans are scattered around the room that smells of the remains of a pizza and cigarettes. The laptop screen light is in the highest brightness and the 26-year-old Saudi student Mohammad Bawazeer’s eyes are tired and seek sleep, but the news is not...

Tharp’s military background leads to IT

Zac Kopp

December 9, 2016


Filed under FEATURES

For Donald Tharp, the U.S. Air Force was not just a reason to defend his country. It was a method to educate. Now, the educational prowess he learned has taken him to Ashland University.Born in Peru, Indiana, Tharp walked in the footsteps of his father, also an Air Force veteran, at the nearby Grissom Air Reserve base.Tharp spent nearly nine years in the Air Force as a pilot before becoming an instructor for their Information Technology division, all while securing his Ph.D in Educational Technology.“In that age of computers [The late 80s to mid-90s], you learned your own capabilities and processes,” Tharp said. His experience with DOS and Mac computers of the pre-internet era helped shape his technology experience into what it is today.“I was the seinor educational technologist, so I helped adopt technology to the Air Force academy,” Tharp said. “In that process, I had to understand new programs like Microsoft Word and things like DVDs while integrating new pieces of technology.”             Tharp’s overseas experience as a top gun in Germany and the Philippines taught him firsthand how the computers that run our military’s most advanced machines work.          “I was pursuing flying, but I was looking to be a teacher,” Tharp said. “I could still fly, but with trainers. This let me geek out a little bit while flying and helping out.”         Eventually, Mr. Tharp returned stateside to remain closer to his family. In lieu of returning to the cockpit, he chose to teach a new generation the controls at an Air Force Academy in Michigan.      “It’s a high-end, top engineering school, and I thought it would be really cool,” Tharp said. “It’s really great, when you see that light bulb come on, that somebody’s learned something.”It was Mr. Tharp’s experience with his computers at home that led him to help others. For 28 years, Tharp taught at the academy twice, then worked as an officer for the U.S. Army Air Liaison, the group that carries out airstrikes and coordinates air power into the Army’s mobilization.“In that process, we found that there was training lacking with what we do as Air Force people’s,” Tharp said. “In 1999 and 2000, we built training CD’s and integrated that technology into the Air Force.”The training on those CD’s came directly from combat experience that Tharp and other officers shared.      “With 180,000 online students in the Air Force at any given time, there’s a need for training,” Tharp said.  His distinguished education and training experience is now leading Ashland’s IT department.     “I’ve done technology integration at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs, grad school at Northern Colorado, and at Lockheed, working with foreign countries,” Tharp said. “I’ve had 800-some people under my command as a group commander stateside, which taught me leadership. I know what high stress really is, and I think my leadership skills have been very well-received.”Between knowing technology and leadership, Mr. Tharp was the ideal choice for interim Executive Director at IT. Already, he has plans for the growth of the university-at-large from his position.“I see growth for the Learn AU department, and I’m hoping IT will expand,” Tharp said. “Everyone loves IT when it works, you can’t survive without security. As we put updates in place, IT will become more user-friendly, seamless, and integrate as part of the AU team. I want to be a part of the solution on both sides.”

‘Tis the Season: Charity opportunities in Ashland

Kaitlyn Moore

December 9, 2016


Filed under FEATURES

Christmas is just around the corner, and everyone is getting into the holiday spirit. It is a time of selfless giving, and also a time of remembering those less fortunate.The simplest way that university students can give back is to put non-perishable foods, school supplies, clothes, and other items in...

Ashland remembers Michael Hudson

Ashland remembers Michael Hudson

Noah Cloonan

December 9, 2016


Filed under FEATURES

As the final buzzer sounds inside Kates Gymnasium, the basketball team looks halfway up the stands and an empty seat stands alone in the reserved seating section.That seat belonged to Dr. Michael Hudson.Dr. Hudson, or Doc as he was known to his students, will be watching the AU sports teams from a different s...

This week’s chapel service inspires students before thanksgiving break

This week’s chapel service inspires students before thanksgiving break

Waylon O'Donnell

November 18, 2016


Filed under FEATURES

With Thanksgiving break just around the corner, the fall semester coming to a close, and finals quickly approaching, it would be crazy for anyone to say that they were not stressed out.  However, if a student was looking for a relaxing environment and a motivational and uplifting message, they don’t...

Putting the “fun” in fundraiser: Greek Life’s Lip Sync raises over $3000 for St. Jude

Putting the “fun” in fundraiser: Greek Life’s Lip Sync raises over $3000 for St. Jude

Kaitlyn Moore

November 17, 2016


Filed under FEATURES

A packed theater Sunday night witnessed great competition as the campus sororities and fraternities duked it out in an epic Lip Sync battle to raise money for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.This epic and traditional Greek Life Battle ends with one sorority and one fraternity winner each yea...

Vocal major performs in senior recital

Renee Borcas

November 17, 2016


Filed under FEATURES

Ashland University seniors Abbie Brady and Deric Dove will present their senior recitals on Nov. 20 in the Elizabeth Pastor Recital Hall. Dove is a baritone and will be assisted by pianist Deb Logan and fellow baritone Michael Cowan. His concert will begin at 3 p.m. and feature music from the Classical and Romantic periods, as well as a few musical theater pieces. Brady’s recital begins at 7:30 p.m. She will also be accompanied by Deb Logan and mezzo-soprano Andrea Disch. Her performance will mostly consist of art songs and operetta. Emily Minns, a senior who will receive an applied music minor on flute, performed a recital last year and described the extensive time and work that goes into preparing for a recital as a music student at AU. The concert must first be approved by the music department chair, Dr. Reed. After that, several hearings take place from a jury of faculty members to confirm that the performer is prepared. Senior performers must also prepare their own program notes. According to Brady, vocal students have added pressure in preparing their recitals. “Instead of singing two pieces for a grade at the end of the semester, you have to have every piece you’ve studied performance ready by your recital date, which for me is almost a month earlier than a jury would be,” Brady said.Brady said that she chose her performance pieces from her past repertoire or from songs that she has always wanted to sing. “The music is usually chosen to be a good variety,” said Minns. “Different styles of music, different time periods, and different difficulties. You can’t do all super hard music or else you’d probably get too tired by the end of the recital, so you alternate between really technical stuff and less crazy stuff.”From there, musicians will practice throughout the remainder of the semester and perform a mock recital for faculty members to ensure preparedness.  “It takes a ton of practice and preparation,” said Minns. “You have to practice a lot since you’re playing a lot of music, and you have to work with your piano accompaniment or any other accompanists you have, so it’s pretty extensive preparation wise.”Brady and Dove have both been coached by Professor Stephanie Sikora who is being released from tenure at the end of the semester. This is why both seniors chose to have their concerts during the fall semester. Brady spoke highly of Sikora, describing the countless hours of preparation they have shared and the strong support she has provided. Brady is incredibly proud of all that she has accomplished while at AU. Alongside preparing for her recital, she is a working double major, president of the choir, and queen of the Madrigal Feaste. While she would be interested in pursuing opera after graduation, she understands the difficulty in entering the field for a career. She plans on going to grad school to pursue her doctorate. “I remember being a freshmen and being told that I would spread myself too thin, but I’m still standing,” Brady said. “I’ve genuinely enjoyed everything I’ve been a part of throughout my four years.” 

Voting may affect relationship status

Renee Borcas

November 3, 2016


Filed under FEATURES

Her hand hesitated over the button. The decision had already been made, but she couldn’t help but feel a twinge of regret. They had known each other since they were in grade school, after all. Click. She pressed down on the button, another online friendship ended for the sake of politics. This story is not a rare event during the 2016 election season, and it isn’t only happening online. According to a Monmouth University poll, seven percent of voters will admit that they’ve lost a friendship over this year’s national election. The 2016 election is divisive across the country. This can be seen through the back and forth of polls in many states. Issues and scandals have caused tension between voters, resulting in strains in relationships, even affecting those of students on the Ashland University campus.  Candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump both have multiple scandals behind them leaving the opposing parties ways to criticize the candidates outside of the issues alone.AU sophomore Allison Montgomery says many voters are paying too much attention to the scandals of the candidates. “I think that a lot of people you know look at the bad side of Hillary but not the good side, and that’s all they see. They also look at the bad side of Donald Trump and not the good side, and that’s all that they see,” Montgomery said. “They’re not taking into consideration which issues matter and what really impacts the country.”Senior Clinton supporter Hannah Kugele thinks that the polarization in this election could also stem from disagreements between the voters on the issues.“I think all of the problems that our country has been facing internally with race and L.G.B.T.Q. issues, aka human rights, has really been prominent in these past few years, making the people of our country want to hear what the candidates have to say about the issues and how they will solve these problems,” Kugele said. The strong-willed opinions that the parties have can even go so far as to impact a student’s relationships with friends and family. Sophomore Trump voter Samantha Stutzman does not think that she would end a relationship over politics, but admitted that it may cause some strain. On the other hand, Kugele does consider another person’s political opinion when forming a relationship, saying that she would not date someone who supported Trump. Kugele also brought up that she has seen tensions between voters growing especially high online.“The internet allows distance from what you say, so people will post the rudest and most hateful things online and not see it as that way because it’s being read through a screen,” Kugele said. “But when it comes to a differing opinion they will take full offense even if it wasn’t as drastic.”Kugele was very confident in saying that she had unfriended anyone that she saw supporting Trump online. Stutzman has considered unfriending people, but she has not officially pressed the button yet.“I think the wide popularity of social media has really added to the problems with this election in many ways,” Stutzman said. “It allows people to lash out on others with opposite opinions and it has added to the dirt digging on candidates which distracts the people from what are the real issues.”For those who do not want to be involved in the back and forth of this election cycle, third party candidates, such as Gary Johnson, have become an option. Johnson may not get enough votes for the presidency, but he has become the voice for those disappointed with both popular candidates. Clinton and Trump go back and forth in the polls depending on the news cycle. However, whether someone is conservative, moderate, or liberal, AU students are feeling the divide between voters as the election is drawing near. “It’s just something to fight over, so they fight over it,” Montgomery said. “This election has gotten a little ridiculous.”

Where they stand: Decision 2016: Issues that matter the most college students

Kate Siefert

November 3, 2016


Filed under FEATURES

College LoansCollege loans possess a big portion of debt in the country currently, which may lead to a poor economy in the future. College affordability has become one of the biggest worries within families for years. The issue of college affordability and college loans was not discussed much in the p...

Impact of politicians on campus

Callan Pugh

November 3, 2016


Filed under FEATURES

In just a week voters will decide who will become the leaders of tomorrow. Between political ads, debates and constant news coverage, it can be hard to ignore the hype of campaign season. It was even harder to ignore the hype when Mike Pence held a rally in Upper Convo for AU Students, Faculty and Staff, and Ashland locals.According to Ben Kunkel, the student programs manager of the Ashbrook Center, rumors of Pence’s appearance happened just one week before the event.The campaign was looking for places to come in Ohio and Ashland was on the list of possibilities. Kunkel speculated that the university was a good place for the campaign to visit because “Ashland is a politically conservative area and the university is a good location in the community to hold the event.” He also guessed that the campaign knew that in a conservative area like Ashland, the rally would have a “fairly friendly crowd.”In an email to the students involved in Ashbrook, Kunkel urged students to attend the Pence rally, regardless of their political leanings, because of the experience the event presented.“Anytime you’re at a school like this, where we’re obviously not in a large metropolitan area, the opportunities to see big name speakers aren’t as common,” Kunkle said. “I think it’s exciting for students to get a chance to be close to something that is so important nationally and to get a chance to see a guy like Mike Pence who may have a deep impact on our nation for the next four years.”Freshman Charlie Sutton explained that though he isn’t very involved in politics he chose to go to the rally purely for the experience.“Hearing Pence speak will probably help a lot [with my decision], Sutton said. “I’m still undecided.”Indiana local and AU student, Nathan Nunemaker, expressed his excitement to see his home state’s governor while in Ohio.“I’ve been to two different Trump rallies in Indiana,” he explained. “I also think it is really good publicity for the university; to get [AU’s] name out there.”For some students, hearing Pence speak was a way of double-checking their opinions about the Trump Pence campaign.“I’m excited to hear firsthand what Pence has to say,” senior Karissa Magnacca explained. “There has been a lot of media influence and I want to know firsthand what’s been edited and what hasn’t and I want to know genuinely if his standpoint has changed overtime. It will give me a more open mind when it comes time to vote.”Senior Nuri Lee was unable to attend the Pence rally but would have liked to go for the experience.“I would get excited about any candidate coming to visit,” Lee said. “I know it is obviously a campaign strategy, but I didn’t think anyone would come to Ashland.”Kunkel was excited for students to have the opportunity to attend the Pence rally so close to the election.“Even just the spectacle of seeing a political campaign is great for students,” Kunkel said. “You get to see it on the news all the time, but to get to see it up close and personal is an opportunity everyone should have at some point.”Early last week, Donald Trump’s son, Donald Trump Jr. also made a visit in Ashland at Fin Feather Fur Outfitters in Ashland County. Although his visit was not associated with the university, having both Pence and Trump Jr. visit the Ashland area throughout their campaign trail is extremely beneficial in promoting the Ashland name.