Police crack down on jaywalking

By Dan Shade

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Jaywalking is an issue that Ashland police have tried to tackle by starting to ticket students.

Safety Services has also become aware of this problem, with many calls from local residents coming in complaining about students illegally crossing the street.

“We receive at least one call a day from a resident about students jaywalking,” said David McLaughlin, Director of Safety Services.

According to McLaughlin, jaywalking is a real issue and it can become very dangerous.

Claremont Avenue is one of the busiest streets in Ashland, and that is the high danger point on campus for jaywalkers.

“It could cost someone their life,” McLaughlin said.

This and other warnings of accidents on Claremont have not stopped students from risking their lives.

Chelsea Mayer and Jeff McNerney are two of many students who feel free to jaywalk through the streets surrounding Ashland University.

“I jaywalk all the time,” Mayer said. “It takes too long if you don’t.”

“I don’t think students care about jaywalking,” McNerney said. “If they get hit, there is the rumor of free tuition.”

According to McNerney, this thought forces drivers to be more alert.

“In a way, you could say jaywalking makes the roads safer,” McNerney said.

Drivers like Cameron Estep are starting to get frustrated with students jaywalking.

“Sometimes I just feel like hitting them,” Estep said. “They are always getting in my way and pissing me off.”

Mayer has not been caught jaywalking, but she has seen a lot of people get in trouble.

“Honestly, who gives a ticket for jaywalking?” McNerney said. “It’s almost as ridiculous as getting pulled over by a bike cop.”

Students like Mayer believe that there are not enough crosswalks and that it takes too long to get around campus.

Claremont Avenue is the main problem area and certain spots of AU are very spread out, explaining why some students feel the need to jaywalk.

“It’s quicker,” McNerney said. “Not saying that the fifteen seconds I save walking to Convo will be productively used later, but still it’s nice.”

Students are not above the law and should be aware that police are stepping up and cracking down on jaywalking.

Jaywalking is an issue that Ashland police have tried to tackle by starting to ticket students. Safety Services has also become aware of this problem, with many calls from local residents coming in complaining about students illegally crossing the street.

“We receive at least one call a day from a resident about students jaywalking,” said David McLaughlin, Director of Safety Services.

According to McLaughlin, jaywalking is a real issue and it can become very dangerous. Claremont Avenue is one of the busiest streets in Ashland, and that is the high danger point on campus for jaywalkers.

“It could cost someone their life,” McLaughlin said.

This and other warnings of accidents on Claremont have not stopped students from risking their lives.

Chelsea Mayer and Jeff McNerney are two of many students who feel free to jaywalk through the streets surrounding Ashland University.

“I jaywalk all the time,” Mayer said. “It takes too long if you don’t.”

“I don’t think students care about jaywalking,” McNerney said. “If they get hit, there is the rumor of free tuition.”

According to McNerney, this thought forces drivers to be more alert.

“In a way, you could say jaywalking makes the roads safer,” McNerney said.

Drivers like Cameron Estep are starting to get frustrated with students jaywalking.

“Sometimes I just feel like hitting them,” Estep said. “They are always getting in my way and pissing me off.”

Mayer has not been caught jaywalking, but she has seen a lot of people get in trouble.

“Honestly, who gives a ticket for jaywalking?” McNerney said. “It’s almost as ridiculous as getting pulled over by a bike cop.”

Students like Mayer believe that there are not enough crosswalks and that it takes too long to get around campus. Claremont Avenue is the main problem area and certain spots of AU are very spread out, explaining why some students feel the need to jaywalk.

“It’s quicker,” McNerney said. “Not saying that the fifteen seconds I save walking to Convo will be productively used later, but still it’s nice.”

Students are not above the law and should be aware that police are stepping up and cracking down on jaywalking. Jaywalking is illegal, even in Ashland.

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